#ThinkpieceThursday – Deep Dread of Uncertainty

Thinkpiece Thursday

At the heart of any character’s inner conflict is change or transformation. The rage and divide in US politics is all about the perception that the country is changing. “It’s not the country I know anymore.”

Demographics are changing. Social mores are changing. Moral taboos are changing, Resistance to these changes is summed in the theme song of the television hit All in the Family.

In a story, someone or something provokes some kind of shift or change in the character or the character’s world. Change is disturbing because what comes next is uncertain. “You are no longer who I expect you to be. You are not predictable.”

Studies have shown that people would rather get a predictable electric shock (pain) now than maybe be (unpredictably) shocked (or not) later.  People show greater anxiety when waiting for an unpredictable shock (or pain) than an expected one. The Joker says: “Because it’s all part of the plan.”

Writers are always advised to write what they know. What writers (and all other human beings) know the most about is change.

Living, by definition, is to change. Nothing in life is static. Change and transformation are all around you. Both impact you every day. You live in an unsettling and constantly changing world. That is especially true today, with the backtracking, outright lying, and whiplash-inducing policy and personnel shifts in the White House.

The world is (and always has been) full of political uncertainty, evolving relationships, personal and professional ups and downs, and, conflicting responsibilities, loyalties, commitments, and desires. Your characters should experience their world in exactly the same way.

You know how painful change and transformation can be. You have experienced extreme, dramatic and, sometimes excruciating change. Your life has been full of unexpected reversals, complex dilemmas, and difficult growth experiences- and so should the lives of your characters. (And there’s no reason why all this turmoil, chaos, and pain shouldn’t be hilarious. Great comedians know: “If it doesn’t hurt. It isn’t funny”.

One of the downsides of the awesomeness of human consciousness is the ability to worry about the future. We know the future exists, but we don’t know what’s going to happen in it. In animals, unpredictability and uncertainty can lead to heightened awareness.

What’s unique about humans is the ability to reflect on the fact that these future events are unknown or unpredictable,  This uncertainty itself can lead to a lot of distress, anxiety, and pain. And that is scary.

 

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Children’s Media Conference 2014

MALORIE BLACKMAN TO DELIVER CREATIVE KEYNOTE AT
THE CHILDREN’S MEDIA CONFERENCE 2014
 

Leading children’s media event to host Waterstones Children’s Laureate

Waterstones Children’s Laureate Malorie Blackman will deliver the creative keynote at this year’s Children’s Media Conference (CMC) which takes place from 2-4 July 2014 in Sheffield.  The keynote is on Thursday 3 July.

Currently in its 11th year, the CMC is the premier event in the UK for supporting children’s media and hosts a global delegation of creatives, producers and distributors of kids’ content across all media.

This year’s CMC has a theme of Child@Heart and will include an impressive array of 50 conference sessions and masterclasses featuring leading children’s media executives from around the world.

Malorie Blackman was appointed the coveted role of Children’s Laureate in 2013 and will hold the post until next year. She has written over 60 books for children and young adults, including the Noughts and Crosses series of novels (Noughts and Crosses won the Red House FCBG Children’s Book Award as well as being included in the top 100 of the BBC Big Read), Cloud Busting (winner of the Smarties Silver Award), Thief (winner of the Young Telegraph/Fully Booked Award) and Hacker (winner of the WH Smiths Children’s Book Award and the Young Telegraph/Gimme 5 Award for best children’s book of the year).  Her latest book is Noble Conflict, a story of love, violence, trust and betrayal.

Malorie is a scriptwriting graduate of the National Film and Television School.  Her work has appeared on TV, with Pig-Heart Boy, which was shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal, being adapted into a BAFTA winning 6-part TV serial.  As well as writing original and adapted drama scripts for TV, Malorie also regularly wrote for CBBC’s Byker Grove.

In 2005, Malorie was honoured with the Eleanor Farjeon Award in recognition of her distinguished contribution to the world of children’s books.  In 2008, she was then honoured with an OBE for her services to Children’s Literature.

Malorie Blackman says: “All children have a right to be seen, heard and represented in the arts. The stories we tell as well as the stories we are told – in whatever form – define us as individuals and as a society.  They show us who we are and what we can be.  But are the needs of our children being met?  Are all of our children being represented?  What can we do to improve the situation?”

Greg Childs, Editorial Director at CMC adds: “Year on year, the CMC continues to explore issues that are relevant to the rapidly changing children’s media landscape. We are genuinely thrilled to have someone of Malorie Blackman’s standing to deliver this year’s creative keynote. With the theme of Child@Heart at the core of this year’s conference, we are excited to hear her thoughts on what appeals to today’s child.”

For more information visit: www.thechildrensmediaconference.com.

 

Summer Workshop in Italy

Friend and colleague from UCLA, Paul Chitlik, now a clinical assistant professor at Loyola Marymount University’s School of Film and Television, holds a residential writing seminar in Europe every summer. This year, the seminar is in Cairo Montenotte, Italy. Here are the details as provided by Paul, who is also the author of Rewrite: A Step-by-Step Guide to Strengthen Structure, Characters, and Drama in Your Screenplay.

Are you thinking about how you can get to the next level with a script you’ve been meaning to write or rewrite? Probably you are. You can deal with both at the same time by signing up for a screenwriting retreat coming up June 16-June 29 in Cairo, Italy. Yes. Cairo Montenotte in the Liguria region of Northern Italy.

We’ll be staying in a sumptuous villa with ten bedrooms, a huge kitchen and 2 living rooms as well as a large swimming pool, a tennis court, a separate pizza house and nineteen acres of land with breathtaking views of the surrounding hills. It is a mere 3 minutes drive from the city center of Cairo Montenotte and 25 minutes drive from the beach. Cairo Montenotte lies in the region of Liguria in the North Western part of Italy and borders on the Piedmonte region to the North. Combined, the two regions boast a long shore-line on the Mediterranean, seaside resorts, ancient ports and towns, hills, plains and many places of historic interest. This part of Italy is known for its delicate food and famous wine.

But you don’t go to a screenwriting retreat for lodging or the food, although we will be having our own local chef prepare lunch and dinner. You go for the concentrated writing experience. This year there will again be two seminars at the same time! I will lead one that will focus on rewriting an existing script. If you prefer to write a new script from scratch, Nanou Matteson, UCLA MFA grad, who has been expertly teaching and coaching writers for 20 years, will lead our second annual first draft seminar.

Nanou has worked with hundreds of writers in addition to attending many of my retreats. She knows my method and has always been a leader in my classes. Her students last year were wowed by her passion, wit, and knowledge.

I’ll be focusing on the usual – story, character, dialogue, then more story, then more story (not a typo), then pages until we get your existing script up to the next level. Nanou will take those who face the blank page through the whole process as if you were in a UCLA 434 graduate seminar, only better since she’ll have only 5 in her section.

Talk to a former participant – it’s intense. There are three hours of seminar every afternoon, office hours in the morning, group meals, long walks after – all focused on script work. Mornings, early afternoons, and, if you’re a night writer, nights will be for writing.

If you were not able to get into one of my 434s or Professional Program advanced classes at UCLA, this may be your only opportunity to see why more than one MFA grad has said, “I learned more in ten weeks with Paul than I learned in two years at bleep University.” By the way, I will not be teaching at UCLA again as I am exclusive to Loyola Marymount University now.

The level is always high – last year we had several MFAs, MFA candidates, and alumni of UCLA’s Professional Program in screenwriting, not to mention professionals from Australia, England, and Germany. Oh, and me, the not-tooting-my-horn former UCLA Prof Program instructor and sometime Visiting Assistant Professor in the MFA program, currently Clinical Assistant Professor at Loyola Marymount University, and author of Rewrite, A Step by Step Guide to Strengthen Structure, Character, and Drama in Your Screenplay, now in its second printing. BTW, you’ll get a copy of the book on your arrival.

The villa is about an hour from Turin, about 45 minutes to Genoa, less than 25 minutes to Savona on the Med. Lots of small villages to explore if you rent a car (you can share – we’ll put you in touch with others in the program). And if you’re feeling frisky, Nice, France is 90 minutes up the coast.

You’re wondering about cost. For Paul’s program, if you have a single room, it will be $3745 by check ($3858 if by PayPal). A shared room will be $3245 ($3343 via PayPal). If you go for Nanou’s startup workshop, a single will be $3495 ($3599 via PayPal) and a double will be the incredibly affordable $2950 ($3039 via PayPal). If there is demand, there will be three triples available at $2745 ($2828 via Paypal). There’s a 10% discount for you if you’ve taken one of our private workshops before.

Think about it – 13 days and nights in an Italian villa, room and board plus instruction for a lot less than, say, tuition only for an equivalent course at a private university. My section will be limited to seven, and Nanou’s section will be limited to five, so you’ll get lots of personal attention.

Deadline has been extended to March 1 for Laurie’s readers for the initial deposit of $200 to hold your place. Contact Nanou immediately, though, if you want to make sure you have a spot. We have only one place left in each seminar. First come, first served. Nanou.matteson@gmail.com.

THIS IS NOT A UCLA or LMU COURSE. THERE IS NO COLLEGE CREDIT FOR THIS SEMINAR. THERE’S JUST THE KNOWLEDGE THAT YOUR SCREENPLAY WILL BE BETTER ONCE YOU’VE FINISHED THE COURSE OR THAT YOU WILL BE WELL ON THE ROAD TO WRITING A NEW SCREENPLAY.

#ThinkpieceThursday – The Role of Impulse in Creating Three Dimensional Characters

41i3GmuVS1L._SL500_AA300_Here is an interesting study from Chris Mooney, Author of The Republican War on Science and The Republican Brain.  The quote doesn’t just speak to politics but how three dimensional characters are created.

Here’s the bottom line: An increasing body of science suggests that we disagree about politics not for intellectual or philosophical reasons, but because we have fundamentally different ways of responding to the basic information presented to us by the world. These are often ways of which we are not even aware–automatic, subconscious–but that color all of our perceptions, and that effectively drive us apart politically.
What’s more, what is true for how we come to our opinions about politics is also, assuredly, true for how we approach “facts” that are perceived to have some bearing on the validity of our political opinions–whether those fac

Here’s the bottom line: An increasing body of science suggests that we disagree about politics not for intellectual or philosophical reasons, but because we have fundamentally different ways of responding to the basic information presented to us by the world. These are often ways of which we are not even aware– automatic, subconscious– but that color all of our perceptions, and that effectively drive us apart politically.

What’s more, what is true for how we come to our opinions about politics is also, assuredly, true for how we approach “facts” that are perceived to have some bearing on (or threaten) the validity of our political opinions–whether those facts are scientific, economic, historical, or even theological in nature.

In the Emotional Toolbox approach to character, a three-dimensional character actually has three dimensions

1) Immediate Response- where the character goes first emotionally

2) Long-Term Orientation- the character’s general philosophy on life and love

3) Strategic Approach- how the character plans and works to achieve a goal

In this post I will consider a character’s Immediate Response.  This is how a character viscerally reacts to an unexpected challenge, opportunity, or threat. (For example aggressive questions at a Press Conference.)

A character’s Immediate Response is where the character goes first emotionally. This response is a character’s automatic reaction when caught off-guard, questioned, or challenged unexpectedly.

110223_rick_santorum_ap_328For example, Power of Conscience characters instantly decide if someone or something is good and true— or bad, unjust, unfair or inhumane. Their first response is to attack any challenge, opportunity, or threat which they believe involves impropriety, immorality or wrong-doing.

These characters are instinctively propelled forward by outrage and moral indignation. Their judgment and action is swift and immutable. They refuse to compromise or back down. They are relentless in confronting what they perceive as evil, corrupt, bad, or ethically unacceptable.

Rick Santorum, a Power of Conscience character, is known for his impulsive comments and passing swift judgement when presented with anything that might violate his standards of decency, ethics, or principles.

mitt_romney_ap110211128027_244x183Alternatively, Power of Truth characters instinctively step back or withdraw to observe, consider, or analyze an unexpected challenge, opportunity, or threat.  When presented with a situation, good or bad, their first response is to step back and consider what the situation really means.

These characters want to be certain that they know what is actually going on as opposed to what appears to be happening. They suspect and try to detect what the real motives are or what is hidden from the superficial assessment. It’s the measured MBA mindset as an Initial Response.

Mitt Romney, a Power of Truth character, is measured, cool, and distant in his response to anything.  He has been roundly criticized for his stiff off-the-cuff remarks and lack of passion when responding to challenges, questions, or difficulty. He is a cautious man who constantly hedges his bets, backtracks, and equivocates.

barack-obama-picture-2On the other hand, Power of Imagination characters instinctively lead from their heart in any unexpected situation. These character feel they can and will connect with something bigger or more extraordinary than themselves. They don’t have to ponder, think or decide. They are compelled to embrace others, bring them along to share their vision, and join their quest.

Barack Obama, a Power of Imagination character, has been criticized for instinctively seeking compromise and collaboration with even those unalterably opposed to him personally, all his policies, and everything he believes in.  Obama, in a crisis, believes in creating “teaching moments” in an attempt to establish common ground and bring people together. His first instinct is to promote a larger vision and inspire others to follow him as a unified whole out any emergency.

These Immediate Reactions are powerful automatic responses to any situation. These responses clearly distinguish characters in the political area and in every other aspects of their lives.

SOPA

Although this website is not dark in protest of SOPA I stand with those who are!  Here is why–

http://mashable.com/2012/01/17/sopa-dangerous-opinion/

Tom Stoppard’s TV Project

Best known for his film and theatre credits, Oscar-winning writer Sir Tom Stoppard tells Michael Pickard how he came to adapt four novels set before and during the First World War into an upcoming BBC/HBO television drama.
“I’m simply not in the television world,” admits Sir Tom Stoppard (left), the renowned British playwright and screenwriter. Although he has been a celebrated writer for the theatre and cinema – he won an Oscar in 1998 for Shakespeare in Love – the small screen has escaped his attention for more than 30 years.
Next year, however, UK pubcaster BBC2 and HBO will air Parade’s End (6×44′), Stoppard’s adaptation of four related novels written by Ford Madox Ford during the 1920s.
The story, played out between 1912 and the end of the First World War, centres on a love triangle between an English aristocrat, his beautiful but cruel wife and a young suffragette with whom he falls in love.
“I wasn’t thinking about coming back to TV or not coming back to TV,” says Stoppard. In fact, he says, he was preparing to write a new play for the stage when Damien Timmer, joint MD of UK production house Mammoth Screen, asked him to look at Ford’s novels.
That was three years ago. This September, a cast guided by Bleak House director Susanna White went on location in England and Belgium as they began committing his scripts to film. Mammoth is producing the show for the BBC in association with HBO Miniseries, Trademark Films, BBC Worldwide and Lookout Point. “Damien had an idea that the novels would make good TV,” says Stoppard. “I read it and thought it was absolutely wonderful. I was really bowled over by it.”
The first three episodes of Parade’s End are based on Ford’s first novel in the series, entitled Some Do Not, while the other three – No More Parades, A Man Could Stand Up and Last Post – will make up the second half of the drama.
“The book has got a very interesting, non-linear structure,” Stoppard says. “It feels like a Russian doll and is quite complicated so I unravelled it and told the story chronologically. I could not do a Russian doll structure. The audience would have had a hard time working out where they were.”
Stoppard is no stranger to working for the big screen, having co-written Terry Gilliam’s Brazil and adapted Robert Harris’s novel Enigma for the 2001 film, as well as co-writing Shakespeare in Love. However, Parade’s End was never considered as a film because “you couldn’t boil it down to a couple of hours. I wouldn’t like to,” he said.
One aspect of the Parade’s End pre-production process that the writer particularly enjoyed were the rehearsals, which gave him an opportunity to run through his scripts with the cast – which includes Sherlock star Benedict Cumberbatch and Vicky Christina Barcelona actress Rebecca Hall. The series is due on air in 2012 although a transmission date has yet to be confirmed.
stoppard_2_printAs reported in C21 Drama Weekly
Best known for his film and theatre credits, Oscar-winning writer Sir Tom Stoppard tells Michael Pickard how he came to adapt four novels set before and during the First World War into an upcoming BBC/HBO television drama.
“I’m simply not in the television world,” admits Sir Tom Stoppard (left), the renowned British playwright and screenwriter. Although he has been a celebrated writer for the theatre and cinema – he won an Oscar in 1998 for Shakespeare in Love – the small screen has escaped his attention for more than 30 years.
Next year, however, UK pubcaster BBC2 and HBO will air Parade’s End (6×44′), Stoppard’s adaptation of four related novels written by Ford Madox Ford during the 1920s.
The story, played out between 1912 and the end of the First World War, centres on a love triangle between an English aristocrat, his beautiful but cruel wife and a young suffragette with whom he falls in love.
“I wasn’t thinking about coming back to TV or not coming back to TV,” says Stoppard. In fact, he says, he was preparing to write a new play for the stage when Damien Timmer, joint MD of UK production house Mammoth Screen, asked him to look at Ford’s novels.
That was three years ago. This September, a cast guided by Bleak House director Susanna White went on location in England and Belgium as they began committing his scripts to film. Mammoth is producing the show for the BBC in association with HBO Miniseries, Trademark Films, BBC Worldwide and Lookout Point.
“Damien had an idea that the novels would make good TV,” says Stoppard. “I read it and thought it was absolutely wonderful. I was really bowled over by it.”
The first three episodes of Parade’s End are based on Ford’s first novel in the series, entitled Some Do Not, while the other three – No More Parades, A Man Could Stand Up and Last Post – will make up the second half of the drama.
“The book has got a very interesting, non-linear structure,” Stoppard says. “It feels like a Russian doll and is quite complicated so I unravelled it and told the story chronologically. I could not do a Russian doll structure. The audience would have had a hard time working out where they were.”
Stoppard is no stranger to working for the big screen, having co-written Terry Gilliam’s Brazil and adapted Robert Harris’s novel Enigma for the 2001 film, as well as co-writing Shakespeare in Love. However, Parade’s End was never considered as a film because “you couldn’t boil it down to a couple of hours. I wouldn’t like to,” he said.
One aspect of the Parade’s End pre-production process that the writer particularly enjoyed were the rehearsals, which gave him an opportunity to run through his scripts with the cast – which includes Sherlock star Benedict Cumberbatch and Vicky Christina Barcelona actress Rebecca Hall. The series is due on air in 2012 although a transmission date has yet to be confirmed.

Embeddable Movie Clips Coming Soon

jawsThis is a boon to those of us who write about films or teach screenwriting or just enjoy revisiting favorite movie scenes!  Check this out–

The deal with AnyClip can make memorable scenes from “E.T.,” “Jaws” and more available by search and embeddable on Facebook.
Hoping to earn money from every snippet of a film, Universal has licensed rights to a vast portion of its library to AnyClip, a company that chops up films digitally and makes every moment searchable.
The deal is the largest in the short history of AnyClip, which, until the Universal deal to be announced Monday, mostly had rights only to independent films.
AnyClip’s intentions are to sign up distribution partners like IMDb.com, Fandango, Hulu and other sites that will incorporate its abilities and movie clips into their offerings. Each clip is accompanied by an opportunity to buy or rent the entire film, and AnyClip has affiliate arrangements with iTunes, Amazon.con and Netflix.
AnyClip also intends on earning revenue through advertising, and visitors to anyclip.com can grab scenes of movies to embed on their blogs, Facebook pages or what have you.

(Universal’s) deal with AnyClip can make memorable scenes from “E.T.,” “Jaws” and more available by search and embeddable on Facebook.

Hoping to earn money from every snippet of a film, Universal has licensed rights to a vast portion of its library to AnyClip, a company that chops up films digitally and makes every moment searchable.

The deal is the largest in the short history of AnyClip, which, until the Universal deal to be announced Monday, mostly had rights only to independent films.

AnyClip’s intentions are to sign up distribution partners like IMDb.com, Fandango, Hulu and other sites that will incorporate its abilities and movie clips into their offerings. Each clip is accompanied by an opportunity to buy or rent the entire film, and AnyClip has affiliate arrangements with iTunes, Amazon.con and Netflix.

AnyClip also intends on earning revenue through advertising, and visitors to anyclip.com can grab scenes of movies to embed on their blogs, Facebook pages or what have you.

18 Poets Represented on Screen

For those of you rhyme-ically inclined– Here is a great listing of screen stories about poets or poetry.

robin-williams-in-Dead-Poets-SocietyThere were two major omission– Barfly, about Charles Bukowsk and Gothic, the Ken Russell extravaganza about poets Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley (writer of Frankenstein).

Definition from About.com: Poetry is an imaginative awareness of experience expressed through meaning, sound, and rhythmic language choices so as to evoke an emotional response. Poetry has been known to employ meter and rhyme, but this is by no means necessary. Poetry is an ancient form that has gone through numerous and drastic reinvention over time. The very nature of poetry as an authentic and individual mode of expression makes it nearly impossible to define.

Discover all the poetic movie listings here:  http://www.totalfilm.com/features/18-awesome-movie-poets

150 of Movie Great One Liners – Video

leslie-nielsen-airplaneTime Magazine has compiled a montage of some of the greatest one liners and famous catch phrases in movie history.  Watch them here and remember your favorites–

Jerry Seinfeld’s Writing Success Secret

seinfeld1A site I really enjoy is LifeHacker.com Recently, I came across an article by Brad Isaac.  He was an aspiring comic and is a lead software programmer and blogger. You can read his motivational strategies every day on his goal setting blog, Achieve-IT!

In this article, Brad talks hanging around comedy clubs and meeting Jerry Seinfeld.  He had a moment for a private chat and asked Jerry what tips he had for a comedian just starting out.  His advice is gold for any writer.

It’s also the premise on which The One Hour Screenwriter eCourse is built.  Success in anything requires incremental steady progress.  Writing one hour a day or one joke a day is how genius is created.

He said the way to be a better comic was to create better jokes and the way to create better jokes was to write every day. But his advice was better than that. He had a gem of a leverage technique he used on himself and you can use it to motivate yourself—even when you don’t feel like it.
He revealed a unique calendar system he uses to pressure himself to write. Here’s how it works.
He told me to get a big wall calendar that has a whole year on one page and hang it on a prominent wall. The next step was to get a big red magic marker.
He said for each day that I do my task of writing, I get to put a big red X over that day. “After a few days you’ll have a chain. Just keep at it and the chain will grow longer every day. You’ll like seeing that chain, especially when you get a few weeks under your belt. Your only job next is to not break the chain.”
“Don’t break the chain,” he said again for emphasis.
Over the years I’ve used his technique in many different areas. I’ve used it for exercise, to learn programming, to learn network administration, to build successful websites and build successful businesses.
It works because it isn’t the one-shot pushes that get us where we want to go, it is the consistent daily action that builds extraordinary outcomes. You may have heard “inch by inch anything’s a cinch.” Inch by inch does work if you can move an inch every day.
Daily action builds habits. It gives you practice and will make you an expert in a short time. If you don’t break the chain, you’ll start to spot opportunities you otherwise wouldn’t. Small improvements accumulate into large improvements rapidly because daily action provides “compounding interest.”
Skipping one day makes it easier to skip the next.
I’ve often said I’d rather have someone who will take action—even if small—every day as opposed to someone who swings hard once or twice a week. Seinfeld understands that daily action yields greater benefits than sitting down and trying to knock out 1000 jokes in one day.
Think for a moment about what action would make the most profound impact on your life if you worked it every day. That is the action I recommend you put on your Seinfeld calendar. Start today and earn your big red X. And from here on out…
Don’t break the chain!

Jerry Seinfeld said the way to be a better comic was to create better jokes and the way to create better jokes was to write every day. But his advice was better than that. He had a gem of a leverage technique he used on himself and you can use it to motivate yourself—even when you don’t feel like it.

He revealed a unique calendar system he uses to pressure himself to write. Here’s how it works.

He told me to get a big wall calendar that has a whole year on one page and hang it on a prominent wall. The next step was to get a big red magic marker.

He said for each day that I do my task of writing, I get to put a big red X over that day. “After a few days you’ll have a chain. Just keep at it and the chain will grow longer every day. You’ll like seeing that chain, especially when you get a few weeks under your belt. Your only job next is to not break the chain.”

“Don’t break the chain,” he said again for emphasis.

Over the years I’ve used his technique in many different areas. I’ve used it for exercise, to learn programming, to learn network administration, to build successful websites and build successful businesses. (Or it could be used for screenwriting)

It works because it isn’t the one-shot pushes that get us where we want to go, it is the consistent daily action that builds extraordinary outcomes. You may have heard “inch by inch anything’s a cinch.” Inch by inch does work if you can move an inch every day.

Daily action builds habits. It gives you practice and will make you an expert in a short time. If you don’t break the chain, you’ll start to spot opportunities you otherwise wouldn’t. Small improvements accumulate into large improvements rapidly because daily action provides “compounding interest.”

Skipping one day makes it easier to skip the next.

I’ve often said I’d rather have someone who will take action—even if small—every day as opposed to someone who swings hard once or twice a week. Seinfeld understands that daily action yields greater benefits than sitting down and trying to knock out 1000 jokes in one day.

Think for a moment about what action would make the most profound impact on your life if you worked it every day. That is the action I recommend you put on your Seinfeld calendar. Start today and earn your big red X. And from here on out…

Don’t break the chain!

The One Hour Screenwriter eCourse gives you specific daily writing tasks you can knock off in an hour a day.  It guides you day-by-day and hour-by-hour from idea to finished first draft.  You’ll never be stuck or stymied again because you will have an action plan broken down in easy-to-follow steps.  Finally finish that screenplay in a motivated manageable way.